Introduction to Spreadable Media

At long last, Spreadable Media by Henry Jenkins, Sam Ford, and Joshua Green has published!

This week marked the book’s debut, along with the final roll out of web exclusive essays, all available in the enhanced online component to the book. Written by a range of contributors, from media scholars to game designers, the essays expand upon the core ideas outlined in Spreadable Media. Read them here.

To wrap up the week, we’re also featuring the full introduction to Spreadable Media: Creating Value and Meaning in a Networked Culture for free (in the name of spreadability). Read it below. And remember to spread!

Introduction to Spreadable Media

New Spreadable Media essays: Week 3

We’re at week three since launching the online component of Spreadable Media: Creating Value and Meaning in a Networked Culture!

Here are this week’s round of web exclusive essays written by selected contributors who have shaped the argument put forth in Spreadable Media:

  • The Value of Retrogames“—Bob Rehak, a film and media studies professor at Swarthmore College, examines how grassroots interest in residual media and culture may coalesce online, sparking new kinds of cultural practices and production.
  • Clothing has passed between different kinds of exchanges for centuries, acquiring different meanings and values in the process—and, in “A Global History of Secondhand Clothing,” filmmaker and MIT media historian Hanna Rose Shell traces and examines those shifting sartorial roles.
  • In “Retrobrands and Retromarketing,” York University professor Robert V. Kozinets discusses the strategies through which companies engage in “retrobranding,” reviving or relaunching brands from the past in ways that capitalize on existing fandoms and provide launching points for the creation of new markets.

Check ‘em out, and stay tuned at http://spreadablemedia.org/essays—where each week leading up to the book’s publication (in January 2013!), a new batch of exclusive essays will be released.

(And hey! Feel free to debate/critique/trash each piece in the comments section. Expand the conversation, transform the ideas. That’s how spreadable media works.)

New Spreadable Media essays: Week 2

Last week we launched the online component of Spreadable Media: Creating Value and Meaning in a Networked Culture at http://spreadablemedia.org.

As promised, here is another round of web exclusive essays by selected contributors who have shaped the argument put forth in Spreadable Media:

Whitney Phillips—doctoral student in English at the University of Oregon—discusses the use of memes as tools for creativity and production in her essay, “In Defense of Memes.”

MIT media historian William Uricchio traces some key chapters of “The History of Spreadable Media in his essay.

University of California–Berkeley media studies professor Abigail De Kosnik examines the labor that fans often provide for media producers in “Interrogating “Free” Fan Labor.”

In “Co-creative Expertise in Gaming Cultures,” Queensland University of Technology researcher John Banks examines the organizational challenges introduced in the process of making and circulating media content.

North Carolina State University marketing professor Stacy Wood explores the value people place on recommendations from everyday people and their potential impact on brands in her essay, “The Value of Customer Recommendations.”

Check ‘em out, and stay tuned at http://spreadablemedia.org/essays—where each week leading up to the book’s publication, a new batch of exclusive essays will be released.

(And hey! Feel free to debate/critique/trash each piece in the comments section. Expand the conversation, transform the ideas. That’s how spreadable media works.)

Spreadable Media: Online

Media scholars, communication professionals, and social media fans—rejoice! The online component of Spreadable Media: Creating Value and Meaning in a Networked Culture has launched!

http://spreadablemedia.org

This extension of the printed book (which publishes in early 2013) offers additional #spreadablemedia material you won’t find in the text, including web exclusive essays by a range of contributors who have shaped the argument put forth in Spreadable Media.

 

To kick things off, we’re featuring web exclusive essays from recent Futures of Entertainment conference speakers.

The one and only Henry Jenkins offers us two exclusive essays: “Twitter Revolutions?” and “Joss Whedon, the Browncoats, and Dr. Horrible.”

Electrified Games designer Alec Austin considers the emotional dimensions of a “moral contract” between producers and audiences in his essay, “The Implicit Contract.”

Ted Hovet, film studies director at Western Kentucky University, examines the way archival content is appraised for value by students and instructors alike in “YouTube and Archives in Educational Environments.”

Anthropologist Grant McCracken explores how companies describe the economic and cultural value generated by audience activities in “Consumers or Multipliers?” 

Sheila Murphy Seles, Director of Digital and Social Media for the Advertising Research Foundation, details the economic value of audience engagement in “Chuck v. Leno.”

Ana Domb, Director of Brand Innovation at Almabrands in Chile, describes complex forms of participation around a Brazilian popular music form in her case study, “Tecnobrega’s Productive Audiences.”

And finally, Xiaochang Li—doctoral student in the Department of Media, Culture, and Communications at NYU—explores the transnational movement of media in “Transnational Audiences and East Asian Television.”

Check ‘em out, and stay tuned at http://spreadablemedia.org/essays—where each week leading up to the book’s publication, a new batch of exclusive essays will be released.

(And hey! Feel free to debate/critique/trash each piece in the comments section. Expand the conversation, transform the ideas. That’s how spreadable media works.)

Rocking Out to Single

—Jiayi Ying

My first day on the job at NYU Press, I had two emails waiting for me. One was to get my ID approved for building access, the second was an assignment to brainstorm and research creative ways to get the word out for an upcoming release called Single: Arguments for the Uncoupled. Getting right down to work, I thought—I liked it. After finally willing away my first day jitters, what really got me excited about the project was the fact that one, it dealt with—argued for, in fact—being single, and two, it promised to dissect Beyoncé’s “Single Ladies (Put a Ring on It)” to make its case. (I don’t know about you but, aside from that Australian fly being named after her a couple of years ago, I hardly think of academic books and Beyoncé in the same train of thought.)

So to say I was excited is an understatement—I was really excited. And, after finally finishing the book, I found myself with a list of songs, TV shows, movies, and books that Michael Cobb had discussed in those 239 pages. Something needed to be done with them, so my lovely supervisor, Jodi, and I compiled a playlist of the songs. For good measure, we asked everyone around the office for their recommendations (because the best things in life are shared, you guys). The result is this mix below, courtesy of Single, and NYU Press’s marketing and sales departments. Enjoy!

[You can also listen here.]

Jiayi Ying is Online Marketing and Social Media Intern at NYU Press. Be sure to look out for her forthcoming profile in our Meet the Interns series on this blog.

Our Authors on Your Radio

So stay in and listen!

-Harvey Molotch, the editor of Toilet: Public Restrooms and the Politics of Sharing (Nyu Series in Social and Cultural Analysis) will appear on Sirius Satellite’s “The Michelangelo Signorile Show” 2/4 @ 4:30 pm

-Margaret Nelson, author of will appear on WLRN’s “Midday,” 2/18 from 1-2pm

-Marjorie Cohn and Lance Tapley, editor and contributor to The United States and Torture: Interrogation, Incarceration, and Abuse will tape an interview with Michael Slate of KPFK this Tuesday, 2/1

NPR Podcast: Title IX, Now and Then


Listen to the author of Getting in the Game on NPR’s Only a Game. They also reviewed the book.

Title IX was signed into law almost 40 years ago, yet it is still often misrepresented and unfairly condemned. Bill speaks with University of Pittsburgh law professor Deborah Brake, author of Getting in the Game, about how the law has changed female athletics and what still can be done to encourage more girls to play sports.

NYUP/Q 004: Podcast with Scott Melzer, author of Gun Crusaders

 

In this episode of our podcast series, Blog Editor Joe Gallagher talks to Scott Melzer, author of Gun Crusaders: The NRA’s Culture War, about the reasons for and results of the NRA’s transformation from an advocacy group into a conservative movement.

Click here for previous episodes.

Required Reading on Dreams

At Blog o’ Gnosis, Minister Ann Hill reviews Kelly Bulkeley’s Dreaming in the World’s Religions: A Comparative History.

Dreaming in the World’s Religions finally answers the basic question: how did people in ancient cultures view dreams?

I call this a basic question, because anyone who spends a significant amount of time working with their dreams inevitably wonders how it was done in the past. In your religion, in other religions; by your ancestors, by other people’s ancestors. Dreams call us to understand our place in the world, and Kelly’s book answers the call because it addresses the problem with both comprehensive scholarship and also a deep love and appreciation for dreams.

You can listen to a podcast of Hill’s interview with Kelly Bulkeley here.

NYUP/Q 003: Podcast with Ari Kelman, editor of Is Diss a System?


 

In this episode of our podcast series, Blog Editor Joe Gallagher talks to Ari Y. Kelman, author of Is Diss a System? A Milt Gross Comic Reader, about the history and lasting legacy of one of America’s first graphic novelists and pre-eminent Jewish humorists.

You can also read a review of Is Diss a System? on the New Republic’s book blog.