Tragedy and the Proper Name

March 18, 2016 nyupressblog 0

So much of the way I think about tragedy as a genre and political category comes from the work of Raymond Williams’s Modern Tragedy, in which the critic labors to show how flawed the elitist linguistic divide separating tragedy as a high art (the tragedy of Comparative Literature, English, and Classics curriculums) versus tragedy’s everyday use as signifying a grave event, a calamitous lost.

What Makes a Story

February 2, 2016 nyupressblog 0

The Secret Life of Stories: From Don Quixote to Harry Potter, How Understanding Intellectual Disability Transforms the Way We Read by Michael Bérubé is out today! This excerpt appeared in The Chronicle of Higher Education. —Michael Bérubé My kids are




The Difference a Mutant Makes

January 28, 2016 nyupressblog 0

—Ramzi Fawaz [This piece originally appeared on Avidly.] Like any good origin story, I’ve told this one a thousand times: The first comic book I ever read was X-Men #80, the 35th Anniversary issue of America’s most popular comic




Are Jews Too Sexy for the Censors?

September 28, 2015 nyupressblog 0

—Jodi Eichler-Levine Jewish authors are tremendously popular when it comes to banned-books lists. Judy Blume, Lesléa Newman, and Anne Frank are all represented on the American Library Association’s 100 Most Banned Books of 1990-1999 and




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