Brexit will fuel citizenship arbitrage

June 24, 2016 nyupressblog 1

—Peter J. Spiro
The unexpected result in the British referendum is hitting the news today like a thunderclap. As the financial markets tumble, few will escape Brexit’s consequences. But none will feel Brexit more than those whose employment and residential security have been contingent on the UK’s continued EU membership.

Buying a Bride vs. Making a Match

June 21, 2016 nyupressblog 0

—Marcia Zug
The stigma of meeting someone online is gone, but there is one glaring exception to this acceptance: mail-order marriage. The dislike of mail-order marriage has a complicated history, but while the reasons men and women seek mail-order marriages have changed throughout the centuries, its use as a means to increase one’s marital options and thereby improve one’s situation through marriage has changed very little.

Survivor’s Guilt

June 20, 2016 nyupressblog 0

—Bernadette Barton
Wrapping my head and heart around the murder of 49 queer people while they were dancing in a gay bar in Orlando, beneath the familiar numb feeling accompanying another story of loss, horror, and violence, is survivor’s guilt. I feel an enormous teary affection for all us struggling to digest the consequences of so many queer lives lost in the very place that is supposed to be our haven, and by someone who, had he allowed it, might so easily have been one of us.

To Better Respect Nature and Authority

June 20, 2016 nyupressblog 0

—Kerry Mitchell
National parks provide nature in its full glory and reality, but they do so while providing a measure of security and comfort that visitors would not naturally encounter without the institution. Such a paradox is not a logical impossibility, but an operation and a strategy. And as much as that sounds like a game, the stakes can be as real as the ground under foot.

Ron Chernow’s Alexander Hamilton Is Not Throwing Away Its Second Shot

June 13, 2016 nyupressblog 0

—Andrew M. Schocket
What’s especially noteworthy about Hamilton’s recent posthumous pop-culture stardom is that it was launched by a dozen-year-old biography that is once again on the best-seller lists: Ron Chernow’s Alexander Hamilton (2004). How should we think about Chernow’s massive account—currently again one of the top-selling history books in the nation—not only as a biography and work of history, but also at the epicenter of this new Hamilton-mania?

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