James Connolly, New York and the Easter Rising

March 28, 2016 nyupressblog 0

—Paul Moses
One of the many pleasures of researching a history of New York’s Irish and Italians was encountering the revolutionary heroes from both homelands who occasionally crossed the city’s stage. Among the most memorable of the Irish visitors is the socialist James Connolly, who is being remembered this weekend as the centennial of the 1916 Easter Rising is marked.

Adoption History and Women’s History Month

March 25, 2016 nyupressblog 0

—Catherine Ceniza Choy
While Women’s History Month encourages us to recognize the individual achievements of pioneering women in various fields, that recognition should not be an end in itself. It would, and should, take far more than a month to find, reclaim, and remember women’s histories that have not yet been canonized.

Women’s History: Rethinking Birth and Food

March 24, 2016 nyupressblog 0

Let us not only celebrate the first woman to head an Obstetrics department, and the first woman at a five star restaurant, but all the women who came before them, whose knowledge is being threatened by professionalization and corporate industrial take-overs of both food and birth.

Tragedy and the Proper Name

March 18, 2016 nyupressblog 0

So much of the way I think about tragedy as a genre and political category comes from the work of Raymond Williams’s Modern Tragedy, in which the critic labors to show how flawed the elitist linguistic divide separating tragedy as a high art (the tragedy of Comparative Literature, English, and Classics curriculums) versus tragedy’s everyday use as signifying a grave event, a calamitous lost.

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