Category: African American Studies

Don’t Forget About Serena

Don’t Forget About Serena

—Ralina L. Joseph
A black woman icon such as Serena Williams has to bear the disproportionate burden of not only being the target of racist attacks, but also of being above responding to them, maintaining a pose of “strategic ambiguity.”

In Black Panther and Wakanda, extraordinary possibilities are realized

In Black Panther and Wakanda, extraordinary possibilities are realized

—Chandra D. Bhimull
In Wakanda, there, is a kingdom, is a nation; are traditions, innovations, scientific marvels and machine-driven feats, natures held in high regard; is where women are unapologetically brilliant and unflinchingly strong; is a where without whiteness; is black genius. In Wakanda, “extraordinary possibilities” are realized, whereas in reality the process of colonization had them “wiped out.”

Black Lives, Black Power, and Black Catholics

Black Lives, Black Power, and Black Catholics

—Matthew J. Cressler
All too often, in both history and historiography, “racial justice” is presumed to be equivalent to a particular mode of protest from a particular period in time; namely, Christian liberal interracial efforts to end segregation in the South. But when we turn our attention to the decade after King’s death, we find that the assassination of Martin Luther King marked the beginning rather than the end of Black Catholic freedom struggles.

Danger and Desire: The Black Sporting Body

Danger and Desire: The Black Sporting Body

—Stanley I. Thangaraj
As athletes around the country take a knee to organize for justice and life, Stanley I. Thangaraj reflects on how race structures sports and everyday life in the United States.

From the March for Science to an Abolitionist Science

From the March for Science to an Abolitionist Science

—Britt Rusert
An abolitionist science moves beyond generic defenses of science in an age of populist skepticism and backlash, requiring an evaluation of different types of science and an excavation of their specific relationships to forms of power and exploitation.

Black History Month in the Age of Trump: How We Remember Now

Black History Month in the Age of Trump: How We Remember Now

—Aida Levy-Hussen
Commemorating Black History Month with extemporized non-sequiturs, Trump’s rejoinder to African American appeals for remembrance and recognition is a turn away from the foundational social premises—good faith, the valuing of history, the idea of a public sphere—that make such desire speakable in the first place.