Category: Current Events

Prosecutors, John Oliver, and Criminal Justice Reform

Prosecutors, John Oliver, and Criminal Justice Reform

—Daniel S. Medwed
Earlier this month, John Oliver did a segment on the work of American prosecutors, including their nearly unbridled power to charge people with crimes, choose whether to disclose evidence, and offer plea bargains. Daniel Medwed reflects on the changes since the publication of his 2012 book Prosecution Complex. Get the ebook on Amazon now for only $1.99.

What We Talk About When We Talk About Crazy Rich Asians

What We Talk About When We Talk About Crazy Rich Asians

—Lori Kido Lopez
Effective Asian American media activism requires analyses of media industries and audiences as well as readings of a film’s specific meaning and how fictional representations connect to larger structures of racism.

The long history of separating immigrant families

The long history of separating immigrant families

—Deborah A. Boehm and Susan Terrio
In recent weeks, the crisis of separated families has dominated the news. But the current crisis has been unfolding for decades, part of a long history of separation and suffering that immigrant children and families have experienced because of US immigration policies and practices.

The social space of the coffeehouse, and who is “welcome” there

The social space of the coffeehouse, and who is “welcome” there

—Shachar M. Pinsker
What does it mean to “belong” in a café? The coffeehouse has always been, and continues to be (even in the age of Starbucks) a complex reflection of the society and culture around it. Yet it has rarely lived up to the expectation that it would be open to all.

Tourism and Holocaust Remembrance

Tourism and Holocaust Remembrance

—Daniel P. Reynolds
The emergence of Holocaust tourism is one aspect of the boom in Holocaust memorialization that typically garners severe skepticism. Rather than dismiss tourism as an inauthentic, low-brow engagement with history, it is time to look more closely at the phenomenon, to appreciate its complexity, and to take more seriously the motivations and insights of its participants.