Category: Jewish Studies

The social space of the coffeehouse, and who is “welcome” there

The social space of the coffeehouse, and who is “welcome” there

—Shachar M. Pinsker
What does it mean to “belong” in a café? The coffeehouse has always been, and continues to be (even in the age of Starbucks) a complex reflection of the society and culture around it. Yet it has rarely lived up to the expectation that it would be open to all.

Tourism and Holocaust Remembrance

Tourism and Holocaust Remembrance

—Daniel P. Reynolds
The emergence of Holocaust tourism is one aspect of the boom in Holocaust memorialization that typically garners severe skepticism. Rather than dismiss tourism as an inauthentic, low-brow engagement with history, it is time to look more closely at the phenomenon, to appreciate its complexity, and to take more seriously the motivations and insights of its participants.

The Forgotten Jewish Element of the Women’s Liberation Movement

The Forgotten Jewish Element of the Women’s Liberation Movement

—Joyce Antler
The complex identities of both Jewish women’s liberationists and identified Jewish feminists should be recognized as important parts of the histories of feminism and Judaism. Today, when the politics of identity are frequently derided as diversionary or labeled deleterious groupthink, the legacy of these pioneering feminists is instructive.

The Awkward Silence in the Wake of Jacob Neusner’s Passing

The Awkward Silence in the Wake of Jacob Neusner’s Passing

—Laura S. Levitt
In the weeks since Jacob Neusner died earlier this fall, there has been a deafening silence from all of those whose lives he took into his hands, from those whose careers he crafted, whose books he published, whose lives he so fully encompassed.

Jacob Neusner (1932–2016)

Jacob Neusner (1932–2016)

—Aaron W. Hughes
Jacob Neusner, among the most published academics in history, passed away on October 8 at the age of 84. Neusner devoted his life to integrating the study of Judaism into the American Humanities. What, if anything, has changed in our post-Neusner world?