Black History Month in the Age of Trump: How We Remember Now

February 28, 2017 nyupressblog 0

—Aida Levy-Hussen
Commemorating Black History Month with extemporized non-sequiturs, Trump’s rejoinder to African American appeals for remembrance and recognition is a turn away from the foundational social premises—good faith, the valuing of history, the idea of a public sphere—that make such desire speakable in the first place.

Remembering the Radicalism of Frederick Douglass

February 25, 2017 nyupressblog 0

—Nicholas Buccola
For Douglass, the fundamental principle at stake was not the rule of law, but the natural rights of the individual. After all, the rule of law is not worth loving for its own sake, but rather because we deem it to be a crucial safeguard of our rights.

Resistance Now and Then

February 1, 2017 nyupressblog 0

—Gerald Horne
African American history provides a textbook for resistance against oppressors and points in a similar direction: that is, to be effective in the U.S., resistance—dialectically—must be global.

Race, ethnicity, and policing

March 12, 2015 nyupressblog 1

Last year, the killings of unarmed black men by white police officers—the shooting of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri and the chokehold death of Eric Garner in New York City—sparked massive protests and a politically-charged

Black History—or Histories—Month?

February 25, 2014 nyupressblog 2

—Andrea C. Abrams A few months ago, a student penned an article for my college’s newspaper on the proper appellation for people of African descent in the United States. He pointed out that there are

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