Remembering the Radicalism of Frederick Douglass

February 25, 2017 nyupressblog 0

—Nicholas Buccola
For Douglass, the fundamental principle at stake was not the rule of law, but the natural rights of the individual. After all, the rule of law is not worth loving for its own sake, but rather because we deem it to be a crucial safeguard of our rights. The rule of law, in Douglass’ words, “is for the protection of rights” and when it fails to serve this function, it undermines its own legitimacy.

Resistance Now and Then

February 1, 2017 nyupressblog 0

—Gerald Horne
African American history provides a textbook for resistance against oppressors and points in a similar direction: that is, to be effective in the U.S., resistance—dialectically—must be global.

Race, ethnicity, and policing

March 12, 2015 nyupressblog 1

Last year, the killings of unarmed black men by white police officers—the shooting of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri and the chokehold death of Eric Garner in New York City—sparked massive protests and a politically-charged




Black History—or Histories—Month?

February 25, 2014 nyupressblog 2

—Andrea C. Abrams A few months ago, a student penned an article for my college’s newspaper on the proper appellation for people of African descent in the United States. He pointed out that there are




Black History Month, post-racial style

February 13, 2014 nyupressblog 1

—Catherine R. Squires I was pleased to be invited by NYU Press to blog about Black History Month, a celebration that some who believe we’re “post-racial” would say is unnecessary. When I was a kid,




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