Black History Month in the Age of Trump: How We Remember Now

February 28, 2017 nyupressblog 0

—Aida Levy-Hussen
Commemorating Black History Month with extemporized non-sequiturs, Trump’s rejoinder to African American appeals for remembrance and recognition is a turn away from the foundational social premises—good faith, the valuing of history, the idea of a public sphere—that make such desire speakable in the first place.

Remembering the Radicalism of Frederick Douglass

February 25, 2017 nyupressblog 0

—Nicholas Buccola
For Douglass, the fundamental principle at stake was not the rule of law, but the natural rights of the individual. After all, the rule of law is not worth loving for its own sake, but rather because we deem it to be a crucial safeguard of our rights.

African-American History in the Age of Black Lives Matter

February 19, 2017 nyupressblog 0

—Akinyele Umoja
History is a weapon that should provide inspiration and the tools to critically analyze the past to move forward. Let us challenge efforts for African-American History Month and Black culture and heritage to be used for Black marginalization and disenfranchisement.

Resistance Now and Then

February 1, 2017 nyupressblog 0

—Gerald Horne
African American history provides a textbook for resistance against oppressors and points in a similar direction: that is, to be effective in the U.S., resistance—dialectically—must be global.

How racism came to be called a mental illness — and why that’s a problem

June 22, 2016 nyupressblog 0

— James M. Thomas and W. Carson Byrd
Few would disagree that racism deserves condemnation, or that racist people shouldn’t change their views. But arguing that racism constitutes an actual mental illness goes a step further. Racism has long been considered the product of economic, social and political forces, not a mental health disorder. What changed?

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