Black Lives, Black Power, and Black Catholics

November 14, 2017 nyupressblog 0

—Matthew J. Cressler
All too often, in both history and historiography, “racial justice” is presumed to be equivalent to a particular mode of protest from a particular period in time; namely, Christian liberal interracial efforts to end segregation in the South. But when we turn our attention to the decade after King’s death, we find that the assassination of Martin Luther King marked the beginning rather than the end of Black Catholic freedom struggles.

Common Laughter

August 18, 2017 nyupressblog 0

Relationships and connections between Miami and Cuba are being forged and lived by the people building and maintaining them across the Florida Straits. The increasing fluidity of popular culture across creates a web of common references, shared experiences, and points of contact that is no doubt contributing to an intensifying transnational cubanía.

From the March for Science to an Abolitionist Science

April 20, 2017 nyupressblog 1

—Britt Rusert
An abolitionist science moves beyond generic defenses of science in an age of populist skepticism and backlash, requiring an evaluation of different types of science and an excavation of their specific relationships to forms of power and exploitation.

Political Culture after Democracy

February 23, 2017 nyupressblog 1

—Eva Cherniavsky
Donald Trump did not create the world of “alternative facts.” Rather, the possibility of his election is the culmination of twinned processes: the dismantling of representational democracy in the U.S., and the de-realization of politics. From the point of view of the elites who rule us, the real problem with Trump is the risk his fascist agenda might foster the resurrection of the people as an oppositional, anti-elite political power.

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