Irish-Americans: Remember from whence you came

March 17, 2017 nyupressblog 0

—Paul Moses
On this St. Patrick’s Day in the midst of a bitter national debate over immigration, Paul Moses remembers John F. Kennedy’s A Nation of Immigrants. “The Irish,” wrote Kennedy, “were the first to endure the scorn and discrimination later to be inflicted, to some degree at least, on each successive wave of immigrants by already settled ‘Americans.’ ”

Remembering the Radicalism of Frederick Douglass

February 25, 2017 nyupressblog 0

—Nicholas Buccola
For Douglass, the fundamental principle at stake was not the rule of law, but the natural rights of the individual. After all, the rule of law is not worth loving for its own sake, but rather because we deem it to be a crucial safeguard of our rights.

African-American History in the Age of Black Lives Matter

February 19, 2017 nyupressblog 0

—Akinyele Umoja
History is a weapon that should provide inspiration and the tools to critically analyze the past to move forward. Let us challenge efforts for African-American History Month and Black culture and heritage to be used for Black marginalization and disenfranchisement.

Resistance Now and Then

February 1, 2017 nyupressblog 0

—Gerald Horne
African American history provides a textbook for resistance against oppressors and points in a similar direction: that is, to be effective in the U.S., resistance—dialectically—must be global.

Jacob Neusner (1932–2016)

October 17, 2016 nyupressblog 0

—Aaron W. Hughes
Jacob Neusner, among the most published academics in history, passed away on October 8 at the age of 84. Neusner devoted his life to integrating the study of Judaism into the American Humanities. What, if anything, has changed in our post-Neusner world?

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