Category: Literary Studies

From the March for Science to an Abolitionist Science

From the March for Science to an Abolitionist Science

—Britt Rusert
An abolitionist science moves beyond generic defenses of science in an age of populist skepticism and backlash, requiring an evaluation of different types of science and an excavation of their specific relationships to forms of power and exploitation.

Black History Month in the Age of Trump: How We Remember Now

Black History Month in the Age of Trump: How We Remember Now

—Aida Levy-Hussen
Commemorating Black History Month with extemporized non-sequiturs, Trump’s rejoinder to African American appeals for remembrance and recognition is a turn away from the foundational social premises—good faith, the valuing of history, the idea of a public sphere—that make such desire speakable in the first place.

Tragedy and the Proper Name

So much of the way I think about tragedy as a genre and political category comes from the work of Raymond Williams’s Modern Tragedy, in which the critic labors to show how flawed the elitist linguistic divide separating tragedy as a high art (the tragedy of Comparative Literature, English, and Classics curriculums) versus tragedy’s everyday use as signifying a grave event, a calamitous lost.

What Makes a Story

The Secret Life of Stories: From Don Quixote to Harry Potter, How Understanding Intellectual Disability Transforms the Way We Read by Michael Bérubé is out today! This excerpt appeared in The Chronicle of Higher Education…. READ MORE

The Difference a Mutant Makes

—Ramzi Fawaz [This piece originally appeared on Avidly.] Like any good origin story, I’ve told this one a thousand times: The first comic book I ever read was X-Men #80, the 35th Anniversary issue… READ MORE